Montgomery county – Montgomery Homestead http://montgomeryhomestead.com/ Thu, 19 May 2022 17:22:33 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Montgomery county – Montgomery Homestead http://montgomeryhomestead.com/ 32 32 County Council gives preliminary approval to next year’s $6.3 billion budget https://montgomeryhomestead.com/county-council-gives-preliminary-approval-to-next-years-6-3-billion-budget/ Thu, 19 May 2022 17:22:33 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/county-council-gives-preliminary-approval-to-next-years-6-3-billion-budget/ Following numerous department-by-department meetings to discuss Montgomery County’s budget for the next fiscal year, county board members gave their preliminary support Thursday to the budget that was submitted by County Executive Marc Elrich. The proposed budget does not include a tax increase. The board will vote on the operating budget for fiscal year 2023 and […]]]>

Following numerous department-by-department meetings to discuss Montgomery County’s budget for the next fiscal year, county board members gave their preliminary support Thursday to the budget that was submitted by County Executive Marc Elrich.

The proposed budget does not include a tax increase.

The board will vote on the operating budget for fiscal year 2023 and the capital improvement program for fiscal year 2023-2028 on May 26.

Each item in the $6.3 billion budget “tells an important story,” Council Chairman Gabe Albornoz said. “Together, they are creating the foundation for what is most important to us: a community with excellent schools, housing for all our residents, strong economic development, green spaces for recreation and relaxation, safe neighborhoods , strong libraries, a community with a healthy public where seniors can age with grace and support, a healthy environment and a safety net that provides food, shelter and health for our vulnerable residents.

The county has more money to work with from federal and state economic stimulus programs due to the pandemic.

Albornoz said the budget places “strong emphasis” on helping vulnerable populations. It includes more than $421 million for the Department of Health and Human Services.

However, Shepherd’s Table Executive Director Manny Hidalgo has emailed supporters urging them to write to county council members asking for increased funding for the Silver Spring organization which feeds and helps the needy of many. other ways.

“We unfortunately failed to convince the Council to approve our request,” Hidalgo wrote in the email. He explained that Shepherd’s Table has seen a 59% increase in demand for meals and social services since 2020.

The proposed budget includes $1 million for a new Office of Food System Resilience and $4 million in one-time funding to support food insecurity. The budget also includes $12 million for minority health initiatives to continue to provide culturally appropriate services and resources.

More than $5.6 million will be allocated to Consolidated Service Centers across the county.

Nearly $3 billion is proposed for schools, and Montgomery College will be fully funded at $312 million, ensuring tuition will not be increased.

Mental health services are set to receive a $3.7 million increase, part of which will fund case management services at 10 high schools that currently do not have a wellness center. An additional $5.5 million is allocated to expand mental health issues through the Street Outreach Network and other community providers.

The proposed budget includes increases for first responders. A portion of this amount will be used for recruitment and retention. About $436,000 will go to the new Police Accountability Board and Administrative Charging Committee to investigate police misconduct and build trust between residents and law enforcement.

Climate change has played an important role in budget discussions. The budget of the Department of Environmental Protection is proposed to increase by 116%. Affordable housing programs are also getting a boost.

Council Vice-Chairman Evan Glass called the budget “an exercise in fiscal discipline”, adding: “It’s a budget that really benefits all of our residents.” He stressed that it includes “an all-time high in education funding”, noting, “This investment is a signal to students and parents that education is a child’s path to success, and it also sets us on a path to enacting the Blueprint for Maryland’s Future in the years to come.”

Glass said: “My priority throughout this budget process has been to ensure that the most vulnerable are safe, healthy and housed.” He specifically highlighted programs for the homeless or those at risk of homelessness, Vision Zero and the policy allowing Ride On buses to remain free for passengers. He also praised the funding of a DC diaper bank and the expansion of community policing.

“In summary, this budget does a lot of good. But there’s still a lot of work ahead of us to make Montgomery County a more just and equitable place. That conversation will continue, but for now, I believe this budget moves us in that direction, is fiscally sustainable, and prioritizes vulnerable communities. We should all be proud.

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South Callaway 6, Montgomery County 5 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/south-callaway-6-montgomery-county-5/ Tue, 17 May 2022 05:32:15 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/south-callaway-6-montgomery-county-5/ MOKANE — The third-seeded South Callaway Bulldogs played their final twice Monday in the District 7 Class 3 Tournament semifinals, but rallied for two runs to eliminate the Montgomery County Wildcats, second-seeded, 6-5 against advancing to the championship against top-seeded father Tolton on Wednesday. Montgomery County hit first with three runs late in the first […]]]>

MOKANE — The third-seeded South Callaway Bulldogs played their final twice Monday in the District 7 Class 3 Tournament semifinals, but rallied for two runs to eliminate the Montgomery County Wildcats, second-seeded, 6-5 against advancing to the championship against top-seeded father Tolton on Wednesday.

Montgomery County hit first with three runs late in the first inning after a two-run double RBI took the lead and a field-loaded pitch hit gave the Wildcats an early 3- 0.

The score remained 3-0 until the Bulldogs launched their offense in the fourth against Montgomery County pitcher Evan Abercrombie.

Two singles started the inning and a passed ball put the runners in scoring position on two ground balls that followed.

Montgomery County wasted no time recovering both runs in the bottom half on two hits and a walk.

South Callaway responded quickly with two extra runs in the top of the fifth on RBI singles from Jacob Martin and Owen Rees.

The score remained 5-4 until the start of the seventh inning when the Bulldogs used a two-out single, triple and double to take a 6-5 lead.

Martin came in to throw for the bottom half and gave Harrison Bishop a brace, but Bishop was kicked out at third base trying to stretch him for a triple to register the first out.

Martin bounced back to knock out the next two batters and secure the semifinal win.

South Callaway (14-14) was led on offense by Rees who went 3 for 4 with two RBIs while Martin added a pair of hits and an RBI.

Montgomery County’s season ends with a 10-8 record as Abercrombie pitched a full game while allowing six runs (five earned) on nine hits with nine strikeouts and no walks allowed.

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Canceled Montco radio stations could be up for grabs https://montgomeryhomestead.com/canceled-montco-radio-stations-could-be-up-for-grabs/ Sun, 15 May 2022 13:02:31 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/canceled-montco-radio-stations-could-be-up-for-grabs/ The Montgomery County Department of Public Safety permanently canceled its five low-power FM radio stations on March 7. After the county submitted an application, the Federal Communications Commission officially revoked the county’s licenses for WRDY, WEMA, WEMZ, WEMK, and WEMQ. Until March, those stations aired 12-minute, 24/7 loops of public service announcements, according to Todd […]]]>

The Montgomery County Department of Public Safety permanently canceled its five low-power FM radio stations on March 7. After the county submitted an application, the Federal Communications Commission officially revoked the county’s licenses for WRDY, WEMA, WEMZ, WEMK, and WEMQ.

Until March, those stations aired 12-minute, 24/7 loops of public service announcements, according to Todd Stieritz, public affairs coordinator for the Montgomery County Department of Public Safety. .

But that was not their original intention.

The county applied for the licenses in 2013, with the goal of using the stations for timely emergency preparedness alerts. But that never really happened, according to Stieritz.

“When we acquired these licenses, we had an ambitious goal. And unfortunately, the realities of staffing, time, and funding simply didn’t allow us to dedicate a full-time person to content development,” Stieritz said.

The stations only reached about 80% of the county, with the coverage areas of the 5 different broadcast stations, according to Stieritz. He said having five different channels also made it difficult to advertise the stations to all Montgomery County residents.

Stieritz also said the county simply doesn’t have the capacity to update radio stations every time they need to send out an emergency alert.

For all these reasons, stations ended up broadcasting only “essentially pre-recorded prep information”.

If listeners tuned in anytime in the past year, they would hear messages about fire safety, weather safety, car safety, or information about COVID-19. Listeners may even have heard a message from the National Fire Administration about cooking fires, Stieritz said.

It is important to note that the cancellation of these stations had no impact on the county’s other emergency time messaging systems. Residents can sign up to receive alerts on their phones through ReadyMontco.

It’s unclear what the cancellation means for people waiting to apply for a low-power FM radio station license. These radio slots may be available to other groups or organizations.

But it’s hard to say when the next FCC filing window will open, according to Pete Tridish.

Tridish started on Prometheus radio project, which contributed to the legalization of community radio. It helps groups learn how to apply, build and operate low power plants. He said many people are waiting to apply for a low-power FM station these days.

Tridish hopes the application window will come in the next 1-2 years.

“Opportunities are very rare,” Tridish said. He said he’s watched the window come up about once every ten years, which is going up.

“It’s a bit like when Jupiter crosses Neptune and Capricorn, it’s when the [FCC decides] to do it,” Tridish said.

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These eight Alabama counties bucked statewide population trends in 2021 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/these-eight-alabama-counties-bucked-statewide-population-trends-in-2021/ Fri, 13 May 2022 12:30:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/these-eight-alabama-counties-bucked-statewide-population-trends-in-2021/ Almost every county in Alabama recorded more deaths than births from 2020 to 2021 as the COVID-19 pandemic tore the state apart. This means that, in most places, Alabamians are not reproducing fast enough to sustain the state’s population. However, more than half of the counties in the state still managed to grow or maintain […]]]>

Almost every county in Alabama recorded more deaths than births from 2020 to 2021 as the COVID-19 pandemic tore the state apart. This means that, in most places, Alabamians are not reproducing fast enough to sustain the state’s population.

However, more than half of the counties in the state still managed to grow or maintain a stable population over the past year. And that’s thanks to the influx of newcomers.

Data recently released by the US Census Bureau shows that 59 of Alabama’s 67 counties lost population through natural change – or the number of births minus the number of deaths – from July 1, 2020 to July 1, 2021.

Only these eight counties recorded more births than deaths: Montgomery, Lee, Tuscaloosa, Russell, Marshall, Shelby, Madison and Bullock.

Related: Alabama’s population grew slightly in 2021, despite heavy toll of COVID pandemic

Although most counties lost people due to natural changes during this period, only 34 counties lost significant population overall. Others who haven’t backed down can thank people who have moved into the county from overseas or elsewhere in the United States.

[Can’t see the map? Click here.]

The main components of a region’s demographic development are births, deaths and net migration. For most Alabama counties, COVID-19 has brought about an unprecedented shift in how populations change. 2020 was the first year in Alabama’s recorded history where the state recorded more deaths than births. Meanwhile, net migration increased in many areas and kept much of Alabama stable.

Even some of the fastest growing areas of the state have suffered greatly during the pandemic. Baldwin County, Alabama’s second-fastest growing county from 2020 to 2021, had the largest total population loss due to natural change.

Limestone County, the fastest growing county from 2020 to 2021, also lost population due to natural change.

Both counties have just seen a huge influx of newcomers, especially from the United States.

[Can’t see the map? Click here.]

In Baldwin County, there were 607 more deaths than births from 2020 to 2021. This represents a loss of 0.3% of the county’s population in one year. On the face of it, that’s not a huge number, but population loss due to natural change is something that didn’t happen often in Alabama before the pandemic.

Baldwin more than compensated for the losses due to the migration. It saw a net increase of nearly 7,000 people from internal migration alone in just one year.

Baldwin County is used to this kind of migration. As the hotbed of Alabama’s beaches, it’s seen some of the highest numbers of internal migrations in the state over the past decade-plus — a big reason it’s grown so rapidly in recent years. But this migration also made Baldwin one of the oldest counties in Alabama, especially among the most populous counties in the state. Of the counties with at least 50,000 residents in 2020, none had a higher median age than Baldwin. Age was one of the main risk factors for negative COVID-19 results.

Meanwhile, international migration hasn’t moved the needle much for most Alabama counties. Jefferson County, the most populous in the state and home to Birmingham, has seen the largest net increase in population due to international migration. But that most important number was only 153, an increase of 0.02%. And Jefferson overall declined.

Against the trend

Eight of the state’s 67 counties actually recorded more births than deaths from 2020 to 2021, bucking the broader trend. This included some of Alabama’s largest counties.

Montgomery County – home to the state capital – recorded nearly 500 more births than deaths during this time, the largest gross natural increase of any county. The trend here is the opposite of most of the rest of the state. However, unlike Baldwin, Montgomery lost population due to internal migration and, overall, because more people moved than moved in.

Madison County, home to Huntsville — now Alabama’s largest city — also recorded more births than deaths, but by a narrow margin. The same is true in Shelby County, a wealthy area south of Birmingham. Both Madison and Shelby recorded around 100 more births than deaths from 2020 to 2021.

The home counties of Alabama’s major universities, Tuscaloosa and Lee counties, each recorded about 300 more births than deaths.

Russell County, just south of Lee on the Georgia line, and Marshall County, just south of Madison, each recorded about 60 more births than deaths during the year.

Do you have an idea for an Alabama data story? Email Ramsey Archibald at rarchibald@al.comand follow him on Twitter @RamseyArchibald. Learn more about Alabama data here.

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Montgomery County returns foreclosure sales to courthouse steps https://montgomeryhomestead.com/montgomery-county-returns-foreclosure-sales-to-courthouse-steps/ Wed, 11 May 2022 13:31:56 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/montgomery-county-returns-foreclosure-sales-to-courthouse-steps/ Catherine Dominguez, Personal editor May 11, 2022Updated: May 11, 2022 08:15 Montgomery County commissioners agreed on Tuesday to remove the county’s designation for foreclosure sales to default the new location to Courthouse Steps.”/> In this file photo, a foreclosure sign sits outside a home for sale. Montgomery County commissioners agreed on Tuesday to remove the […]]]>


Montgomery County commissioners agreed on Tuesday to remove the county’s designation for foreclosure sales to default the new location to Courthouse Steps.”/>

In this file photo, a foreclosure sign sits outside a home for sale. Montgomery County commissioners agreed on Tuesday to remove the county’s designation for foreclosure sales to default the new location to Courthouse Steps.

Ross D. Franklin, STF/AP

Montgomery County commissioners agreed on Tuesday to remove the county’s designation for foreclosure sales to default the new location to Courthouse Steps.

According to Precinct 3 Commissioner James Noack, the sale interfered with Commissioners’ Court meetings and County business.

“I think we have to get them out of this period,” Noack said.

County Attorney BD Griffin said the process of designating a different location for the sale is taking 91 days, noting the August sale would still be in the commissioners’ courtroom. However, by removing the current location designation, the sale would automatically move to the Courthouse Steps, 301 N. Main.

Foreclosure sales take place at 10 a.m. on the first Tuesday of each month. If that day falls on a public holiday, the dale is the next working day.

Griffin noted that most sales are now online.

Sales and resales of overdue tax foreclosures will be conducted by county officers through an online platform operated by Real Auction at www.realauction.com.

Bidders must register on the Real Auction website.

cdominguez@hcnonline.com

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MCPD celebrates 100 years; Organize Community Day on May 14 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/mcpd-celebrates-100-years-organize-community-day-on-may-14/ Mon, 09 May 2022 21:50:24 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/mcpd-celebrates-100-years-organize-community-day-on-may-14/ The Montgomery County Police Department (MCPD) will host Community Day, a family-friendly event to celebrate the department’s 100th anniversary on Saturday, May 14. Before having a police force, Montgomery County was a rural area of ​​approximately 34,000 people. The county now has a population of 1.1 million and a police department with 1,300 officers and […]]]>

The Montgomery County Police Department (MCPD) will host Community Day, a family-friendly event to celebrate the department’s 100th anniversary on Saturday, May 14.

Before having a police force, Montgomery County was a rural area of ​​approximately 34,000 people. The county now has a population of 1.1 million and a police department with 1,300 officers and 500 professional staff, according to the MCPD.

The free event will take place from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m., rain or shine, at the Montgomery County Fairgrounds in Gaithersburg. Attendees will enjoy exhibits from the Montgomery County Police and Montgomery County Fire Departments, showcasing K-9 techniques and a motorcycle course. Other activities include face painting, a magician, inflatables, music, and community stage performances.

A variety of food options will also be available for purchase in the food truck aisle.

MCPD says that on this celebratory date, they not only want to look back on what they have accomplished, but rejoice in how they will meet the challenges ahead.

“At the end of the day, we need the community to fight crime and help them. It is therefore very important for us to organize these types of community events to continue to improve our relations with the community and to listen to the community, so that we can do our job effectively,” the police spokesperson said. , Carlos Cortes.

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Kingdom Fellowship Opens New Community Care Center – Meeting Human Needs in Prince George, Montgomery and Howard Counties https://montgomeryhomestead.com/kingdom-fellowship-opens-new-community-care-center-meeting-human-needs-in-prince-george-montgomery-and-howard-counties/ Sun, 08 May 2022 02:24:41 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/kingdom-fellowship-opens-new-community-care-center-meeting-human-needs-in-prince-george-montgomery-and-howard-counties/ By Deborah Bailey, AFRO DC News Editor “Thy kingdom come” is a colloquialism that will soon take on a whole new meaning in the upper northwest corner of Prince George’s County. Senators Ben Cardin (D-MD) and Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), elected officials from Prince Georges County and Montgomery recently joined Kingdom Fellowship pastor Matthew Watley […]]]>

By Deborah Bailey,
AFRO DC News Editor

“Thy kingdom come” is a colloquialism that will soon take on a whole new meaning in the upper northwest corner of Prince George’s County.

Senators Ben Cardin (D-MD) and Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), elected officials from Prince Georges County and Montgomery recently joined Kingdom Fellowship pastor Matthew Watley and board members of the Kingdom Global Community Development Corporation for a groundbreaking ceremony. The celebration was in honor of the start of development of the new Kingdom Care Center in Calverton, Md, which is scheduled to open in December 2022.

The new center showcases a tri-county approach to meeting human needs according to Watley, reaching beyond artificial county and city boundaries to meet needs “where the people are.”

The center is located a few blocks from the border between Montgomery County and Prince George’s County and less than 10 minutes from the western border of Howard County.

“We are excited to launch this new project which will allow us to provide comprehensive services to residents of Montgomery County, Prince George’s County and the Howard County area,” Watley said, waving to the crowd gathered outside the new six-story tower located next to Kingdom Fellowship Church’s new location on Beltsville Drive.

The Kingdom Care Center is funded by a $2 million federal appropriation led by Senators Van Hollen and Cardin, and $11 million allocated to the Global Service Center passed by the Maryland General Assembly in accordance with the fiscal year budget 2023 from Governor Larry Hogan.

“The beauty of this vision and the power of this vision are simple. We don’t live our lives in silos. We don’t live our lives in compartments. The idea behind Kingdom Care Center is that we provide a holistic approach to the needs of individuals and families,” said Van Hollen.

The Kingdom Care Center will serve as a “one stop shop” for the social service needs of citizens of the three counties where Prince Georges, Montgomery and Howard County meet. The Center will provide employment and vocational training services, a health and wellness center, clothing, a nutrition center, educational services and supports, housing services and a legal aid center .

Senator Ben Cardin commended the Kingdom Fellowship family for stepping forward to meet spiritual and physical needs in the Tri-County area.

“There are a lot of elected officials and government officials here because we are proud of our partnership,” Cardin said.

“That’s why this groundbreaking work is so important. These are services that the community desperately needs and that we cannot provide at the government level. Only by working with you can we reach the people who really need these services. I am so proud to represent you in the United States Senate,” Cardin concluded.

Former Montgomery County Executive Isaiah “Ike” Leggett, one of the supporters of the Kingdom Care Center effort, simply “clarified” by saying that too many factors and participants had to synchronize efforts so that the he inauguration of the Kingdom Care Center is solely the result of human effort.

“But for God,” Leggett marveled.

“All the things that came together to make this happen. But for the grace of God, that wouldn’t have happened,” Leggett proclaimed as the audience nodded in affirmation.

Kingdom Fellowship chief of staff Sundra Mann said the impetus to find a place to serve the community came from the experiences church volunteers have had during the pandemic.

“We just started doing food giveaways at the start of the pandemic (Covid-19 pandemic) at our two locations in Montgomery County and here in Prince Georges County,” Mann said.

“Once we saw the long lines of people waiting for food and the multiple needs beyond food that people presented, we began to ask ourselves, what more can we do to help lives where did the pandemic hurt?” she concludes.

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How family ties and work at Montgomery Co. shape the goals of Frederick County’s new superintendent https://montgomeryhomestead.com/how-family-ties-and-work-at-montgomery-co-shape-the-goals-of-frederick-countys-new-superintendent/ Fri, 06 May 2022 11:09:40 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/how-family-ties-and-work-at-montgomery-co-shape-the-goals-of-frederick-countys-new-superintendent/ Cheryl Dyson looks to family values ​​and the Montgomery County experience as she prepares to lead Frederick County Public Schools. After a 15-year-old student was shot and injured in a bathroom at Magruder High School in Montgomery County, Maryland, Cheryl Dyson contacted the school principal. Dyson, the associate superintendent of Maryland’s largest school system, was […]]]>

Cheryl Dyson looks to family values ​​and the Montgomery County experience as she prepares to lead Frederick County Public Schools.

After a 15-year-old student was shot and injured in a bathroom at Magruder High School in Montgomery County, Maryland, Cheryl Dyson contacted the school principal.

Dyson, the associate superintendent of Maryland’s largest school system, was still on leave after his mother died at the time. Still, she couldn’t understand how the school administration felt — her instincts were telling her to check in.

Slated to become director of Frederick County Public Schools on July 1, Dyson plans to use her desire to build relationships while acclimating to her new role. School board president Brad Young said last month that Dyson was a “shining star” during the interview process. She is the first African-American superintendent in the county’s history.

“I’m grateful for the opportunity to show little girls and little boys that if you work really hard you can achieve great things and you don’t achieve those things in isolation,” Dyson said. “It takes a combination of hard work, really strong relationship building, flexibility and openness to learning.”



Dyson spent 22 years in the Montgomery County school system, most recently as a zone associate superintendent overseeing 70 schools. All of her experiences helped shape her vision as a leader, she said, but she noted that the five years she was principal of Strathmore Elementary School in Silver Spring were critical to her development.

In addition to community events, the school held “Dream Big Work Hard Saturdays,” where parents and students discussed school improvement goals and strategies.

Overseeing many schools in Montgomery County, Dyson said, helped her figure out the best ways to collaborate, like when she planned a lunch with the principals to touch base. But she plans to meet and listen to Frederick stakeholders to assess community needs.

“I don’t plan on doing FCPS Montgomery County, but I think there are many skills, strategies, and resources that I learned and gained in MCPS that can help FCPS,” Dyson said.

During her first weeks as superintendent, Dyson said she plans to assess data on absenteeism and suspensions. She is particularly curious about which students are suspended and which schools they attend, information she said she thought about throughout the application process.

Ensuring students have access to mental health resources and opportunities to reinforce concepts taught during the school year during the summer months are also high on Dyson’s agenda.

“I’m going to do a lot of listening and a lot of learning,” said Dyson, who also said she was “always a teacher. I’m still a student.”

The search for a new superintendent in the county came after the departure of former superintendent Terry Alban. This followed a settlement with the Department of Justice regarding the school system’s isolation and restraint practices.

The county, Dyson said, has ended isolations and is committed to following guidelines. A professional development series is also in the works, she said.

“[I] I want to assure parents that we are committed to the success of our students in special education and that our interventions are tailored to student needs so that when you look at Individual Education Plans, we can start to see growth” , said Dyson.

At the school board meeting where she was nominated, Dyson broke down in tears as she spoke about her mother, who died in January. Dyson, one of four children but the only daughter, said she often watches TV with her mother on the phone.

Her mother attended every promotion, she said, and proudly attended board meetings.

These family values, like love, faith and encouragement, Dyson said, helped her meet the challenges of leadership roles.

“That’s why I think I’m so passionate about working in education,” Dyson said. “The people I work with, I care about deeply. It’s that kind of care that gets you through COVID, or gets you through yet another difficulty in a school.

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Montgomery County market remains strong for home sales https://montgomeryhomestead.com/montgomery-county-market-remains-strong-for-home-sales/ Wed, 04 May 2022 16:12:47 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/montgomery-county-market-remains-strong-for-home-sales/ Real estate continues to be a hot topic in Montgomery County and throughout the region, from record valuations to continued record sales despite rising interest rates. According to the Houston Association of Realtors, despite new listings weekly, buyer demand has continued to outstrip supply. This leads to multiple offers on homes, pushing prices into record […]]]>

Real estate continues to be a hot topic in Montgomery County and throughout the region, from record valuations to continued record sales despite rising interest rates.

According to the Houston Association of Realtors, despite new listings weekly, buyer demand has continued to outstrip supply. This leads to multiple offers on homes, pushing prices into record territory.

In fact, after hitting record highs in February, buyers pushed prices to even higher levels in March. The average price of a single-family home rose 11.4% to $410,923, while the median price jumped 15.5% to $335,000. This is the first time that the price of a single-family home in Houston has exceeded $400,000.

“We are experiencing unprecedented market conditions in Houston with a frenetic pace of home buying despite limited inventory, rising prices and ever-increasing interest rates,” said HAR President Jennifer Wauhob of Better. Homes and Gardens Real Estate Gary Greene. “This is happening amid ongoing supply chain issues and rising prices for everything from gas to groceries, which only add to consumer pressures. We expect to see buyers start to pull back a bit until conditions stabilize, if that is indeed the case. »

The March 2022 market update showed single-family home sales rose 4.1% with 9,693 units sold, compared to 9,309 in March 2021. Year-to-date, the market is ahead 10.8% on last year’s record pace. The rental market is also strong, as consumers who are unable to purchase a home at the moment are opting to rent instead.

Homes priced between $500,000 and $1 million led the way in sales for the month, posting a 36.1% year-over-year gain. The $250,000 to $500,000 housing segment came in second, climbing 24.0%. This was followed by the luxury market – made up of homes priced at or above $1 million – which rose 16.0%.

However, those looking for homes under $250,000 should buy more expensive homes or opt to rent, HAR officials noted. Single-family rental homes were up 18.3% year over year. Townhouse and condominium leases remained unchanged. The average rent for single-family homes rose 6.7% to $2,075, while the average rent for townhouses and condominiums rose 7.6% to $1,852.

In Conroe, while existing homes continue a positive trend, the community is seeing several new developments bringing new homes to the area. According to information from the City of Conroe, there have been 253 housing starts since March.

Most recently, Conroe City Council approved a 10-year service agreement with Municipal Utility District No. 202 for the development of a new 1,310-acre subdivision near Conroe-North Houston Regional Airport. .

On the heels of this action, Woodlands Developer The Signorelli Co. announced that it is developing a planned development also near the airport that will include more than 1,000 homes and dedicate more than 45 acres of green space, lakes and recreational facilities.

cdominguez@hcnonline.com

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UPDATE: 2 MPs hospitalized after saving children from house fire https://montgomeryhomestead.com/update-2-mps-hospitalized-after-saving-children-from-house-fire/ Mon, 02 May 2022 20:41:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/update-2-mps-hospitalized-after-saving-children-from-house-fire/ Update, 5:45 p.m.: Two Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office deputies were hospitalized after saving two children from a house fire, according to a press release from MCSO spokesman Lt. Mark Wojnarek. After arriving at the scene on Monday afternoon, deputies Zach Fortner and Cody Evans quickly discovered two children trapped inside the burning house, according to […]]]>

Update, 5:45 p.m.: Two Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office deputies were hospitalized after saving two children from a house fire, according to a press release from MCSO spokesman Lt. Mark Wojnarek.

After arriving at the scene on Monday afternoon, deputies Zach Fortner and Cody Evans quickly discovered two children trapped inside the burning house, according to the news release.

Using a nearby ladder, the two deputies entered through a bedroom window, located the children, and were able to exit the house with them.

Montgomery County Emergency Medical Services provided care and transported deputies to Tennova ER – Sango. Both deputies are being treated for smoke inhalation but are listed in stable condition and will continue to be observed overnight, Wojnarek said.

The children are currently in the care of their mother, he continued.

“I am proud of Zach and Cody for their selfless and heroic actions this afternoon,” Sheriff John Fuson said in the press release.

“If these two deputies were not on the scene as quickly as they were, we would be reporting a very different and tragic story tonight. Thanks to their actions, these two children have been saved and a mother rejoices instead of crying. God is good!”

Previously:

CLARKSVILLE, TN (CLARKSVILLE NOW) – A house fire broke out on Briarwood Drive in Montgomery County on Monday afternoon, and two children were rescued from the home by emergency responders.

Emergency crews responded to the scene at 646 Briarwood Road, around 1:30 p.m., according to a Facebook post from the Montgomery County Sheriff’s Office.

Ed Baggett, director of the Montgomery County Emergency Management Agency, told Clarksville Now that while the residence has not been totaled, there is significant damage to about 50% of the house.

“The mother is out and county officers got both kids out, so everyone is fine,” Baggett said, adding that all three were taken to the hospital to be checked.

Baggett said investigators are on the scene to determine the origin of the fire.

The sheriff’s office has asked drivers to avoid the area as emergency crews work to secure the residence and deputies provide traffic control.

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