Property tax – Montgomery Homestead http://montgomeryhomestead.com/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 21:22:29 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png Property tax – Montgomery Homestead http://montgomeryhomestead.com/ 32 32 Let’s make a deal – ITEP https://montgomeryhomestead.com/lets-make-a-deal-itep/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 21:22:29 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/lets-make-a-deal-itep/ .ITEP Staff From the Bay State to the Golden State, lawmakers across the country are making deals and negotiating budgets with major tax implications. In Massachusetts, executives recently announced that they had agreed to a framework for a tax bill that would not only provide one-time refund checks, but also increase several credits, including the […]]]>

.ITEP Staff

From the Bay State to the Golden State, lawmakers across the country are making deals and negotiating budgets with major tax implications. In Massachusetts, executives recently announced that they had agreed to a framework for a tax bill that would not only provide one-time refund checks, but also increase several credits, including the earned income tax credit and the credit for children and dependents. Unfortunately, the plan also offers a boon to the state’s wealthiest by raising the estate tax threshold from $1 million to $2 million. In Pennsylvania, a budget deal has been reached that includes a significant state corporate tax cut and one-time direct property tax credits. Meanwhile, further west, CaliforniaThe final budget will come with payments aimed at mitigating some of the effects of inflation and reducing cannabis taxes, in addition to the slew of tax-related ballot measures that voters will have to vote on. november. And finally, the legislators of Alaska and North Carolina can celebrate after adopting and signing their budgets, while Michigan and Missouri lawmakers will continue to deliberate as they have faced deadlocks and vetoes from governors.

Major State Tax Proposals and Developments

  • PENNSYLVANIA lawmakers have agreed to a budget plan that will cut the state’s net corporate tax rate from 9.99% to 4.99% by 2031. It’s expected to cost millions over the next two next few years, even if the impact of the reduction in corporate tax rates on employment growth is negligible. The budget also increases the cap on the state’s film production tax credit program from $70 million to $100 million, plus an additional $5 million for “Pennsylvania film producers.” In terms of tax credits, the budget adds $140 million in one-time direct property tax credits for seniors and persons with disabilities and $25 million for a child care tax credit equal to 30% of the federal credit. – KAMOLIKA DAS
  • In a monumental victory for NEW JERSEY families, Governor Phil Murphy recently signed legislation creating a child tax credit program that will provide $500 for each child under the age of six if they earn $30,000 or less and lower amounts for families earning up to $80,000. – KAMOLIKA DAS
  • The final budget agreement in CALIFORNIA included inflation relief payments of up to $1,050, as planned. Lawmakers have also cut cannabis taxes, though some in the industry say the cuts are insufficient. And several tax-related initiatives will end up on national and local ballots in November, including the possibility of legalizing and taxing sports betting (at 10%), an effort to raise taxes on multi-millionaires to fund mitigation. climate change and wildfire prevention, a vacant property tax to improve housing affordability in San Francisco, and a mansion sales tax to fund homelessness in Los Angeles. – DYLAN GRUNDMAN O’NEILL
  • MASSACHUSETTS Lawmakers announced they would send Governor Charlie Baker a tax proposal that would include one-time refund checks for those who filed returns in 2021 and earned more than $38,000, but no more than $100,000 for single filers. and $150,000 for joint filers. Other changes included in the framework are increases to the main circuit breaker credit, earned income tax credit, child and dependent tax credit and tenant deduction. The bill also increases the estate tax threshold from $1 million to $2 million. – MARCO GUZMAN

State Overview

  • ARKANSAS Governor Asa Hutchinson plans to call a special session to cut income taxes, despite cutting personal and corporate income taxes late last year. Republican leaders signaled consensus around proposals to accelerate corporate and personal tax rate cuts passed in 2021.
  • CONNECTICUT will implement a new requirement that governors’ budget proposals must include estimates of how they will affect racial and socioeconomic inequality.
  • A new law in MAINE which will freeze property tax increases for permanent residents aged 65 and over will come into effect on August 8.
  • Despite passing a budget, legislators in MICHIGAN are still deadlocked on a tax cut plan after several proposals were opposed by Governor Gretchen Whitmer.
  • MISSOURI Gov. Mike Parsons vetoed a $500 million refund plan and instead called for a special session focused on permanent tax cuts.
  • A proposal for a constitutional amendment in MONTANA who would have placed a hard cap on property taxes will not appear on the ballot after failing to get enough signatures.
  • A Republican candidate for governor of NEW MEXICO proposed annual tax refunds of $100 for all residents, including children.
  • protesters in NEW YORK launched an “Occupy the Hamptons” effort to demand higher taxes on wealthy people and greater commitment to fighting climate change.
  • In OKLAHOMA, Governor Kevin Stitt signed a bill that would effectively allow companies to write off their business investments by writing them off as an expense. They are the first state to do so.
  • The TEXAS the budget is expected to be cash-filled as the legislature enters the 88th session next January. Some lawmakers are already calling for using the surplus for property tax cuts.
  • WEST VIRGINIA lawmakers will be convened in a special session on tax cuts at the end of the month. Governor Jim Justice is proposing a plan to cut the state income tax rate by 10%, which would reduce state revenue by $254 million a year. Some senators are instead pushing for a refund of property taxes on vehicles. This aligns with a November ballot initiative that would authorize state lawmakers to eliminate personal property taxes paid on commercial inventory, commercial machinery and equipment, and personal vehicles. If these property taxes were eliminated entirely, counties would lose about $515 million a year for public schools and local government services.

What we read

  • Ian Berlin and William G. Gale of Brookings Institute argue that fears of reduced labor force participation if the child tax credit expansion becomes permanent are small, and that the benefits of reducing child poverty should far outweigh the concerns .
  • Mississippi State Minority Leader Derrick Simmons writes about the state’s regressive move to a flat tax and how it will deepen inequality and undermine Mississippi’s ability to invest in public services.
  • Allegheny College professor Joe Tompkins explains why PennsylvaniaThe corporate net income tax cut is not expected to generate employment growth. Factoring in the $6 billion in lost revenue from corporate tax cuts over the next decade, each new job will cost the state nearly $270,000.

If you like what you see in the recap (or even if you don’t), please send comments or tips for future posts to Aidan Davis at [email protected]. Click here to sign up to receive the summary by email.



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Eastern Ohio Regional Hospital seeks funds to upgrade building | News, Sports, Jobs https://montgomeryhomestead.com/eastern-ohio-regional-hospital-seeks-funds-to-upgrade-building-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 05:20:33 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/eastern-ohio-regional-hospital-seeks-funds-to-upgrade-building-news-sports-jobs/ Ty Compton, a representative for the law firm Bricker and Eckler, and Chris Jones of Ohio’s Property Assessed Clean Energy program recently told Martins Ferry City Council that the East Ohio Regional Hospital is seeking funding to bring improvements to his building. City attorney Paul Stecker introduced Compton and Jones, who […]]]>


Ty Compton, a representative for the law firm Bricker and Eckler, and Chris Jones of Ohio’s Property Assessed Clean Energy program recently told Martins Ferry City Council that the East Ohio Regional Hospital is seeking funding to bring improvements to his building.

City attorney Paul Stecker introduced Compton and Jones, who came to talk about the Property Assessed Clean Energy funding program and what triggered it.

“The hospital is doing a few projects and wants to use PACE funding, and that will require legislative action on our part,” Stecker told the council, adding that Compton and Jones were there to explain the program and answer questions.

Jones said Ohio was one of the first of 20 states to authorize legislation 12 years ago allowing local governments to create a “special energy improvement district.”

This allows commercial building owners to improve various energy-related areas, such as renewable energy, for example, to make improvements to their buildings.

“OHIO PACE is a program administrator that works with landowners to secure PACE funding for qualified energy projects. It coordinates efforts with local governments and connects owners with capital providers and PACE private contractors to ensure the successful financing and installation of energy projects,” says ohpace.org.

Bernie Albertini, administrator of EORH, said work had already begun on several projects, including air conditioning, lighting, new boilers, windows and a new roof.

“Everything is rated on energy efficiency,” Albertini said, which is what PACE is geared towards.

He added that the boilers have most of the work to do, but the lighting is about 80% complete and the windows and roof are about 25%.

Regarding the PACE request, Jones said the EORH would ask the city for a special assessment “to place on their property tax to pay off the original PACE loan for these energy efficiency improvements.”

Jones said the assessment will only be placed on hospital property and will not affect any other ratepayers in the city.

The hospital’s petition, which includes details of the project, would be submitted to the board for approval.

“This will include, again the PACE special assessment … the financial terms, and then the city council will approve the actual assessment, the levy of those assessments, which in turn will certify to the county auditor’s office,” said Compton.

Once the project has been determined to be eligible for PACE funding, the special assessment is then added to the property’s tax bill.

“It will have no direct effect on property owners in the tax district or the town of Martins Ferry,” Jones said, which Compton confirmed. He also confirmed that there will be no cost to the city or residents for their property, in response to a question from Director of Services Andy Sutak.

When Councilwoman Suzanne Armstrong asked why city approval would be needed, Compton said there were “private PACE lenders who will provide long-term financing.” If long-term financing is attached, these private lenders should have good security, and the special valuation “is the security that created this PACE financing market, not just in Ohio but across the country,” a- he declared.

“And so, obviously, as a private tax authority, you are the only ones who can approve this special assessment,” Compton explained.

“Anything that has an energy-saving component could be eligible for the PACE program,” Compton said, citing examples such as roofs, windows or solar panels.

Stecker added that it is essentially a “public-private partnership” in which private parties provide funding but are reimbursed through a special levy.

“So instead of paying off your loan, your property taxes go up on that particular parcel and they pay the increased property taxes, and then the county pays the funder,” Stecker said.



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Cagle Talks Budget Points and Tax Exemptions for Disabled Veterans | Local News https://montgomeryhomestead.com/cagle-talks-budget-points-and-tax-exemptions-for-disabled-veterans-local-news/ Sun, 10 Jul 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/cagle-talks-budget-points-and-tax-exemptions-for-disabled-veterans-local-news/ The proposed budget of $112 million for the next fiscal year is “very good,” said Killeen City Manager Kent Cagle. But he pointed out that 57% of property tax exemptions go to disabled veterans — a factor that impacts the city’s financial situation. “What happened to us was the state said, ‘We’re going to give […]]]>

The proposed budget of $112 million for the next fiscal year is “very good,” said Killeen City Manager Kent Cagle. But he pointed out that 57% of property tax exemptions go to disabled veterans — a factor that impacts the city’s financial situation.

“What happened to us was the state said, ‘We’re going to give a benefit and you, the town of Killeen, are going to pay for this benefit that we’re giving.’ We don’t go after veterans, but the state grants this exemption, and we have to pay for it.All other new homes built in Killeen are tax exempt.

Property taxes represent a large portion of the city’s revenue. In fiscal year 2022, the total levy on certified values ​​was nearly $54 million, with a tax rate of $0.7004. A proposed tax rate of $0.6326 for fiscal year 2023 would bring the total levy to $57.3 million.

“The base number to focus on here is the total spending in the enacted budget in 2022 of $106 million,” Cagle said. “This budget that’s being proposed…is $112 million, and it depends on what you think the rate of inflation is right now,” or about 6%.

Depending on the veterans disability rating of 10% to 100%, veterans can receive between $5,000 and $12,000 in property value tax exemptions, according to the state comptroller’s website.

“In the budget, what are the main increases? Cagle said. “It’s sales tax and property tax.”

In the current budget, sales tax revenues are projected at just over $33 million. It is expected to reach $34 million in fiscal year 2023.

“It’s, I think, a really good budget,” Cagle said. “But that doesn’t solve all the problems. There’s really no way to do that without massive amounts of new revenue. But I think the important thing is to understand that we are making good progress in many areas.

All city funds — general, capital projects, solid waste, debt service, street maintenance, aviation, drainage services, hotel occupancy tax and capital projects — total about $250 million.

“One thing I tell all of our new hires when I talk to them is that you’re joining a company as big as a Fortune 500 company,” Cagle said. “It has nearly $10 billion in property tax value and about $250 million in annual revenue and 1,300 employees.”

City officials applied for a SAFER grant that would allow for the hiring of 21 firefighters.

“The feds would pay three years of their salary,” Cagle said. “We can’t budget for that because we can’t qualify for the grant (that way).”

The city operates with too few employees.

“Just doing the basics, we have a very small number of employees to do the job,” Cagle said. “We have few employees per capita and low expenditure per capita. In a service organization, most of your money is tied up with employees. »

He said Killeen employs 8.1 people per 1,000 people. The population of Killeen is approximately 161,000. Waco, Denton, Beaumont, Amarillo, Temple, Abilene, Odessa, Lubbock, Garland, Mesquite, Round Rock, and Copperas Cove employ more employees per 1,000 people.

As for water and sewer rates, no increases are expected for residential customers, Cagle said. The minimum charge remains at $19.26, with an additional $3.80 for 3,0001 to 15,000 gallons used.

And street maintenance is budgeted at $9 million for fiscal year 2023, up from $4.89 million this fiscal year.

“We tried to take everything you gave us in those planning sessions and work it into the budget,” Cagle said. “That wasn’t all, but we did a lot.”

A budget workshop is scheduled for July 18, followed by a public forum on July 19 and public hearings on July 26 and September 6. The proposed tax rate is expected to be set on August 2. The public hearing on the tax rate and adoption of the budget is scheduled for September 13.

The new fiscal year begins on October 1.

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Property taxes could rise next year in Indian River County https://montgomeryhomestead.com/property-taxes-could-rise-next-year-in-indian-river-county/ Fri, 08 Jul 2022 19:55:23 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/property-taxes-could-rise-next-year-in-indian-river-county/ VERO BEACH – Taxpayers will be spared a property tax rate increase next year, thanks to a 13.5% increase in the county tax roll. But taxes are likely to increase further. That’s what County Administrator Jason Brown told members of the Indian River County Chamber of Commerce Friday in his state of the county update […]]]>

VERO BEACH – Taxpayers will be spared a property tax rate increase next year, thanks to a 13.5% increase in the county tax roll. But taxes are likely to increase further.

That’s what County Administrator Jason Brown told members of the Indian River County Chamber of Commerce Friday in his state of the county update at the Intergenerational Center.

The proposed budget for 2022-23 is expected to be $452 million, down from $542 million this year and 4.3% lower than the 2006-07 budget of $472 million.

“We had to work hard to get the budget where we wanted it to be,” said Brown, who served as the county’s budget manager for 12 years before becoming county administrator in 2017. , we have a good and strong tax roll so that we can live within our means.

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Million tax cut suggested as starting point for Topeka budget talks https://montgomeryhomestead.com/million-tax-cut-suggested-as-starting-point-for-topeka-budget-talks/ Mon, 04 Jul 2022 10:49:39 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/million-tax-cut-suggested-as-starting-point-for-topeka-budget-talks/ Topeka’s mayor and city council are expected to begin discussing a potential city budget for 2023 this week that, if passed in its original form, would cut the city’s property tax by $1 million. A budget of this amount would reduce municipal taxes for homeowners whose assessment values ​​have remained the same, but most do […]]]>

Topeka’s mayor and city council are expected to begin discussing a potential city budget for 2023 this week that, if passed in its original form, would cut the city’s property tax by $1 million.

A budget of this amount would reduce municipal taxes for homeowners whose assessment values ​​have remained the same, but most do not.

Assessment values ​​rose about 13.5% on average last March for residential properties in Shawnee County, county assessor Steve Bauman announced that month.

“About 89% of properties will see an increase in appraised value,” Bauman told county commissioners at the time.

Assessment values ​​are combined with mill levy levels to determine how much local property owners will pay in property taxes.

Topeka City Councilman Tony Emerson told the Capital-Journal in March that he hoped all Shawnee County taxing authorities would reduce their factory fees to lessen the impact of rising assessment values. .

Topeka has always maintained the mill levy, but that could change

The Mayor and City Council of Topeka saw this graphic explaining the potential ramifications of one of three options they were considering that would set a starting point for developing the city's 2023 budget. council have asked city staff to arrange for them to consider this particular option, which is to reduce the city's property tax by $1 million.

Emerson has served since May 2016 on the Topeka Board of Directors, which for nine consecutive years has approved a budget for the following year aimed at keeping the city’s property tax levy the same.

This year, that could change.

On June 21, the governing body, made up of the mayor and the city council, ordered city staff to cut the municipal tax by one million in the document it will use as a starting point for drawing up the budget. 2023 of the city.

The body was offered three potential starting points for developing the city’s 2023 budget at its June 21 meeting by Stephen Wade, the city’s director of administrative and financial services.

The mayor and council rejected two of these budget options.

The Mayor and City Council of Topeka saw this graphic explaining the potential ramifications of one of three options they were considering that would set a starting point for developing the city's 2023 budget. Council rejected this particular option, which seeks to cut the city's property tax by $1.97 million next year.

The tax on the city’s mills would have been lowered by two mills.

Another would have kept the levy at its current level of 39.939 mills, which equates to $459.30 in municipal property taxes for the owner of a $100,000 home.

The mayor and council instead chose that day to make his starting point a third option, described by Wade as “a bit of a compromise”, which would cut the municipal tax by a thousandth.

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Texas Economy Generates More Tax Revenue, Sparking Talks of Tax Cuts | New https://montgomeryhomestead.com/texas-economy-generates-more-tax-revenue-sparking-talks-of-tax-cuts-new/ Sat, 02 Jul 2022 20:16:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/texas-economy-generates-more-tax-revenue-sparking-talks-of-tax-cuts-new/ AUSTIN — The Texas economy is so hot that the state comptroller will soon raise its revenue forecast for the current cycle by a “significant” amount. Already, Republican politicians are talking about more property tax cuts, though paying for them in the long run is always tricky. On Friday, Comptroller Glenn Hegar said Texans are […]]]>

AUSTIN — The Texas economy is so hot that the state comptroller will soon raise its revenue forecast for the current cycle by a “significant” amount.

Already, Republican politicians are talking about more property tax cuts, though paying for them in the long run is always tricky.

On Friday, Comptroller Glenn Hegar said Texans are back in restaurants and live entertainment venues after the coronavirus pandemic subsides, and industrial sectors led by oil and gas are boosting revenue from sales tax with ever-increasing material purchases.

“State sales tax collections jumped in June, outpacing inflation, with strong revenue growth from all major economic sectors,” Hegar said in a written statement.

A drop in purchases of furniture, sporting and leisure goods was offset by an increase in spending on services, he pointed out in his last two monthly revenue-raising announcements.

“Restaurant and service sector receipts were again strong in June as consumers continue to spend more on live events with entertainment options becoming available that have not been available for the past two years,” Hegar said.

But the real driver of this positive revenue picture is business spending, with the mining sector which includes oil and gas nearly doubling its sales tax collections from a year ago. In addition, receipts from the manufacturing, wholesale trade and construction sectors rose sharply, he said.

When lawmakers meet in January, they could have as much as $30 billion in unspent government revenue, Hegar said recently.

That prompted Gov. Greg Abbott and GOP legislative leaders to talk optimistically about granting more school property tax cuts.

“We need to use a substantial portion of this money to reduce property taxes in Texas,” Abbott tweeted.

In October, state leaders pocketed $3 billion in fiscal stimulus assistance from President Joe Biden’s American Rescue Plan Act for future use to reduce school property taxes.

Federal COVID-19 assistance is a one-time boon. Hegar’s announcement, however, means there will be additional state discretionary income that lawmakers can apply to a range of pressing needs.

The property tax relief will compete with Republicans’ belief that the state should spend more on border security, as they attack Biden over his immigration policies and school safety, after the May 24 school shooting in Uvalde.

Border and school security are priorities, according to a “budget instruction” letter sent Thursday to state agencies.

“It is imperative that state agencies remain fiscally and operationally efficient with state resources,” wrote Sarah Hicks, Abbott’s senior budget and policy assistant, and Jerry McGinty, director of the Council of legislative budget, a 10-member panel of key legislators.

“Budget requests should reflect conservative values ​​and keep in mind that we are going through a period of global and national economic uncertainty that could impact our state.”

Perhaps because state GOP leaders are talking about tax cuts, the letter did not ask agency heads to submit possible ways to cut spending, as has often been the case.

For several months, it has been evident that sales tax revenue was well above Hegar’s conservative estimate last November.

The state collected $35.3 billion in sales tax in the first 10 months of the current fiscal year, an increase of 20.6% over the same period a year earlier.

Through June, with two months remaining in the state’s fiscal year, Texas has raised more than $1 billion more than it raised in the entire fiscal year. 2020 – and just $800 million less than last year’s total.

At last month’s clip — the state brought in $3.7 billion — sales tax collections reported for July could easily push the year-to-date total past November’s estimate of Hegar for the full fiscal year 2022 ($38.6 billion). And that would leave the August loot in sauce.

From September to June, oil and gas severance tax collections increased over the same period of fiscal 2021 by 89.7% and 192.6%, respectively. However, 75% of any growth in power generation tax revenue goes to the rainy day fund and the state highway fund.

Total tax revenue increased by 27.1% over the comparable 10-month period of the previous year.

Hegar, the state’s Republican tax collector and revenue estimator, said later this month he will revise his “certification revenue estimate” from last fall.

Once the Legislative Assembly passes a budget or supplementary spending bills, as it has done several times in the past year, the Comptroller must certify that there will be enough revenue to pay for them.

Next January, Hegar will release its estimate for the next two-year budget cycle. It will govern how much lawmakers can spend when crafting the 2024-25 budget.

“Due to an extended period of historically high revenue, later this month, Hegar will provide an update to the certification revenue estimate released in November 2021,” his office’s press release reads. “This update will result in a significant increase in estimated respendable income for the 2022-23 biennium.”

In November, Hegar projected a final balance for this round of $11.99 billion in state discretionary income and a cushion of $12.62 billion in August 2023 in the “rainy day fund,” or savings account.

At the recent state GOP convention in Houston, Hegar told conservative online news platform The Texan that the state’s general fund is expected to end at the end of the year with a balance between 15 and 16 billion dollars. By Aug. 31, 2023, the rainy day fund should have $13.5 billion, he said. The addition of these two figures gives us a surplus of up to $30 billion.

Former Comptroller’s Office analyst Eva DeLuna Castro of the Every Texan group, however, warned that the state’s appearances of untold wealth can be deceiving.

“Basically there will be a lot of money, but a lot of it will be banned,” said DeLuna Castro, whose group is advocating for increased state spending on education and health care for Texans in low and middle income.

She noted that voters’ decision in May to approve an increase in the mandatory homestead exemption on school property taxes from $25,000 to $40,000 will burn $439.1 million in government revenue. State next year. Additionally, in next year’s session, lawmakers will need to address a $4.4 billion underfunding of Medicaid and the children’s health insurance program this cycle, she said.

Cost overruns from Abbott’s Lone Star operation totaled $975.8 million, she noted. Health care managed by the prison system for inmates is in deficit, and the state could face additional costs in the event of wildfires, hurricanes and other natural disasters. Even before exemptions on homesteads and border cost overruns, lawmakers had only $3.6 billion of “room” under a tax expenditure limit set in the Texas Constitution, a noted DeLuna Castro.

Related: ‘Booming’ Texas Economy Sets Monthly High in Sales Tax Collections for Third Straight Month

Texas Public Policy Foundation chief economist Vance Ginn remains optimistic about tax cuts.

“There is a historic opportunity to significantly reduce Texans’ property tax bills next session,” said Ginn, who served in the Federal Office of Management and Budget under former President Donald Trump.

Property tax rates for school maintenance and operations can and should be reduced further than they were by the 2019 legislature, Ginn said. Rainy day funds and school district reserves can be tapped to support tax rate reductions, he said.

“Spending restraint and tax relief should be top priorities given the affordability crisis due to inflation and rising property taxes,” he said.

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🌱 Gwinnett County Property Tax and Values ​​+ $558,270 Donated Locally https://montgomeryhomestead.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-gwinnett-county-property-tax-and-values-558270-donated-locally/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 21:13:50 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/%f0%9f%8c%b1-gwinnett-county-property-tax-and-values-558270-donated-locally/ Hello everyone. It’s me, Nicole Fallon-Peek, your Loganville-Grayson Daily host. Come and discover the most important things happening these days in town. First, today’s weather forecast: A few thunderstorms; wet. High: 85 Low: 71. Here are the top five stories from today in Loganville-Grayson: Gwinnett County has proposed keeping its tax rate the same, but […]]]>

Hello everyone. It’s me, Nicole Fallon-Peek, your Loganville-Grayson Daily host. Come and discover the most important things happening these days in town.


First, today’s weather forecast:

A few thunderstorms; wet. High: 85 Low: 71.


Here are the top five stories from today in Loganville-Grayson:

  1. Gwinnett County has proposed keeping its tax rate the same, but expects to collect about $34 million more in property tax revenue due to higher property values. Gwinnett County Chief Assessor Stewart Oliver said the average value of residential properties has increased by $87,000 and the county needs to reassess about 83% of properties. (Atlanta Journal Constitution)
  2. Yesterday, June 29, it was announced that the 2022 Mitsubishi Electric Classic raised and donated $558,270 to local charities. A number of Gwinnett County and Metro Atlanta charities and organizations, including Gwinnett Special Needs Schools and Grayson Cluster Schools Foundation, received the donations. (Gwinnett Daily Post)
  3. Rey Martinez, former mayor of Loganville and Republican candidate for Georgia’s District 111, attended the grand opening of the Republican National Committee’s Hispanic Community Center in Suwanee yesterday, June 29. Suwanee, Gwinnett County, is one of several cities across the country opening Hispanic community centers as part of the RNC’s multimillion-dollar outreach to the Hispanic community, according to the article. (Monroe Local)
  4. The University of Oregon football team, the Ducks, have made offers at two residents. Linebacker Jalen SmithClass of 2023 from Loganvilleand Pierre-JosephClass of 2023 of Loganville. (247 sports)
  5. Looking for a new home in the Loganville-Grayson area? Check the link to see a list of open houses in your area today, June 30, Saturday July 2 and Saturday July 9. (Loganville-Grayson Patch)

Today in Loganville Grayson:

  • Preschool story time At the Grayson Branch of the Gwinnett County Public Library (10:30 a.m.)
  • Free COVID-19 Vaccination Event At the Grayson Branch of the Gwinnett County Public Library (11:00 a.m.)
  • Railyard Axhouse At 2125 Loganville Highway Suite 204 (8:00 p.m.)

From my notebook:

  • The Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office Investigative Services Unit has warned the public about fraudulent phone calls attempting to receive payment for fraudulent active warrants. The same phone number, 770-904-9621, has been reported several times recently. Do not provide any credit card information over the phone call! (Facebook)
  • Learn how to earn your accredited high school diploma with the Gwinnett Library! Click here to find out more. (Instagram)
  • The Community Outreach Section of the Gwinnett County Sheriff’s Office attended the second annual Pride Party! The Sheriff’s Office plans to continue to recognize and celebrate the local LGBTQ+ community. (Facebook)

More from our sponsors – please support the local news!


Thanks for following and staying informed! I’ll join you early tomorrow with your next update.

Nicole Fallon Peek

About me: Nicole Fallon-Peek is a journalist and editor with a degree in media, culture and communication from New York University. She has been a freelance journalist, editor, managing editor and editorial director for various B2B news outlets. She currently co-owns and manages content creation agency Lightning Media Partners.

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RCB significantly increases property tax https://montgomeryhomestead.com/rcb-significantly-increases-property-tax/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 05:52:01 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/rcb-significantly-increases-property-tax/ RAWALPIDI: The cash-strapped Rawalpindi Cantonment Board (RCB) has increased residential and commercial property taxes after increasing the annual rental value of properties by up to 1,000%. The RCB has sent hefty bills with a 15% increase in property tax (after increasing the annual rental value) to citizens who have already caved under financial pressure. According […]]]>

RAWALPIDI:

The cash-strapped Rawalpindi Cantonment Board (RCB) has increased residential and commercial property taxes after increasing the annual rental value of properties by up to 1,000%.

The RCB has sent hefty bills with a 15% increase in property tax (after increasing the annual rental value) to citizens who have already caved under financial pressure.

According to the cantonment council’s property tax formula, the owner of a residential building must pay 20% property tax on the annual rental value and 30% property tax on commercial properties.

But now the annual rental value has been increased by the RCB to such an extent that if the owner was supposed to pay an annual tax of Rs50,000, he will have to pay Rs100,000.

The same is true for residential and commercial properties rented by landlords and increasing their annual rental value by more than a thousand times over the market rate, notices have been issued to pay an annual property tax of 15%.

The notices issued are so heavy that they have considerably aggravated the troubles of the already financially burdened citizens.

Public representatives of the RCB also expressed their concern over the huge increase in taxes after increasing the rental value of properties more than a thousand times and asked for relief from citizens in the severe wave of inflation.

On the other hand, the business community has also expressed deep concern over the increase in the annual rental value of commercial properties. Anjuman-e-Tajiran Rawalpindi cantonment general secretary, Zafar Qadri, said the cantonment council had issued property tax notices to traders and residents who were already facing a depressing situation in terms of inflation and of companies.

It specifies that the rental value is assessed even higher than the market rate, the market rate is applied to the former tenant and the property tax is greatly increased retrospectively after the taxation of previous years.

Zafar Qadri said he has raised his concerns about the current property tax system with cantonment council authorities, but the issue has yet to be resolved.

Meanwhile, RCB Superintendent of Taxes Ayub Tabassum said that “we do self-assessment of residential buildings and commercial buildings according to the market rate and the tax is collected at the rate of 20-30% after we have valued the annual rental value of the properties according to market rate.” Only then do we send out notices to collect a 15% tax on it and if anyone has an objection they can appear before the committee of ‘evaluation and present its position,’ he said, adding that according to the ruling, property tax is levied on the rental value of establishments.

Published in L’Express Tribune, June 28e2022.

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Lexington County, Cities Spend More on Police, Fire in Upcoming Budgets | Colombia News https://montgomeryhomestead.com/lexington-county-cities-spend-more-on-police-fire-in-upcoming-budgets-colombia-news/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 13:30:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/lexington-county-cities-spend-more-on-police-fire-in-upcoming-budgets-colombia-news/ LEXINGTON — Lexington County and its major cities will spend more money on police departments, fire departments and public works in the new fiscal year beginning July 1. While some cities won’t change taxes and fees, others will fund higher budgets with property tax increases to offset losses from the COVID-19 pandemic and dramatic US […]]]>

LEXINGTON — Lexington County and its major cities will spend more money on police departments, fire departments and public works in the new fiscal year beginning July 1.

While some cities won’t change taxes and fees, others will fund higher budgets with property tax increases to offset losses from the COVID-19 pandemic and dramatic US inflation. last year.

Lexington County

Lexington County plans to spend a large portion of its $166.8 million budget on increasing funding for emergency services and law enforcement.

Although the budget is 3.8% higher than last year, Lexington County will not raise property taxes for its residents.

Emergency services will receive $50.4 million, just under a third of the budget, and law enforcement will receive $57.8 million.

The additional revenue will go towards a pay raise for all Lexington Sheriff’s Department employees, as well as expanding Lexington County Fire Departments, County Councilwoman Debbie Summers said.

“Public safety as a whole is probably the most important service we can provide to the public,” Summers said, “and that’s where our focus has been.”

With the exception of the Irmo Fire District, Lexington County will not raise property taxes for its residents in the coming year.

However, the county still projects it will earn $163.6 million in revenue, including $117.9 million from property taxes. The increase in revenue comes from the county’s prediction that it will earn more in fees, permits and sales, and property taxes.

cayce

Cayce will raise property taxes in the next fiscal year to offset pandemic-related losses and the recent spike in inflation.

A large part of the budget will be spent on increasing the salaries of city employees.

The 2022-23 budget, which totals $16.7 million, is significantly higher than last year’s budget, largely due to increased revenue from property taxes. The 8% tax increase will cost residents an additional $1.35 per month for every $100,000 of home value, according to the budget.

Additionally, Cayce expects $1.2 million in hospitality tax revenue, 60% more than the city’s budget for the 2021-22 fiscal year.

Much of Cayce’s budget will be allocated to capital expenditures such as the purchase of five patrol vehicles and a fire engine, as well as the 4% increase in the cost of living for employees of the city.

“Since 2019, the City of Cayce has stood firm in the face of COVID,” Councilman Skip Jenkins said at a June 22 city council meeting, “but more importantly, our employees have stood firm. don’t even cover the raises due to these ladies and gentlemen. »

West of Colombia

Residents of West Columbia can expect a property tax hike starting July 1, which will fund the city’s $21 million budget and allow more money to be allocated to public safety departments.

The tax increase will cost residents $2.48 more per month for every $100,000 of home value. The city justified the tax hike by citing a sharp rise in inflation over the past year and continued progressive inflation throughout the pandemic.

In addition to property taxes, West Columbia expects the majority of its revenue to come from business licenses and franchise fees.

The majority of West Columbia’s budget, which is 13% higher than last year’s budget, will be spent on funding the police department, fire department and public works such as sanitation, parks and streets.


$14 billion spending plan that nets taxpayers $1 billion heading for SC Governor Henry McMaster

City of Lexington

Much like its neighboring towns, the majority of the city’s $15.4 million budget will fund general government operations, parks, sanitation and transportation.

Raking in the biggest chunk is the Lexington Police Department, which will receive just under 50% of the money.

However, unlike its neighbors, Lexington will not be asking residents to pay more property taxes in the coming year.

Despite maintaining its property taxes, Lexington expects $14.3 million in revenue, or 6.5% more than its 2021-22 revenue. Just under half of Lexington’s expected revenue will come from licenses and permits.


Governor McMaster vetoes $53 million in budget appropriations.  Nearly half of this sum is intended for the 1 Columbia project.

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A new group wants to cut Baltimore’s property taxes in the name of fairness. The town hall describes it as “absurd”. – Baltimore Sun https://montgomeryhomestead.com/a-new-group-wants-to-cut-baltimores-property-taxes-in-the-name-of-fairness-the-town-hall-describes-it-as-absurd-baltimore-sun/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 04:06:01 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/a-new-group-wants-to-cut-baltimores-property-taxes-in-the-name-of-fairness-the-town-hall-describes-it-as-absurd-baltimore-sun/ A new group called Renew Baltimore is proposing a plan to lower the city’s property tax rate in hopes of rebuilding the city’s population, bringing “greater economic equity” and increasing incomes and prosperity. stability. Like almost every city, Baltimore’s biggest source of revenue comes from property taxes. The city has a property tax rate more […]]]>

A new group called Renew Baltimore is proposing a plan to lower the city’s property tax rate in hopes of rebuilding the city’s population, bringing “greater economic equity” and increasing incomes and prosperity. stability.

Like almost every city, Baltimore’s biggest source of revenue comes from property taxes. The city has a property tax rate more than double that of neighboring counties, and Renew Baltimore said it has been killing economic growth and driving residents out for decades.

According to Renew Baltimore, the biggest loser is low-income, mostly black homeowners who pay a higher proportion of their income in property taxes.

Experts told the Baltimore Sun that lowering property taxes will almost certainly spur economic development. However, some were hesitant to use the word “equity,” arguing that the biggest winners would be wealthy, mostly white homeowners and outside investors gentrifying neighborhoods. Still, many said lowering property taxes might be a good idea — with some caveats.

Renew Baltimore’s ambitious plan to cut the tax rate from 2.248% to 1.25% over six years could go ahead without input or approval from elected officials. Renew Baltimore said it was gathering signatures – 10,000 are needed – for a possible referendum in November that would bypass City Hall and put the question directly to voters.

Renew Baltimore presents itself as a grassroots organization, but the group enjoys the support of high-level former city officials. Andre Davis, a former U.S. District Court judge and former city attorney, supports the initiative, as do former Democratic City Council members Rikki Spector and Carl Stokes.

The group’s treasurer, Anirban Basu, is the CEO of the Sage Policy Group, an economic policy advisory group in Baltimore.

“There are a lot of people who would like to live in the city. They want to live in the city,” said Basu, a former city dweller who lives in Baltimore County. “They can’t pay the taxes. Pensioners are evicted. Why not create a situation where more people are invited? »

Baltimore’s renewal plan calls for two amendments to the city’s charter. The first would put in place a six-year schedule for the reduction of property taxes, capping them at 1.25%. The second would remove a provision in the city’s charter that could be interpreted as a ban on tax-related charter changes.

Davis said that to his knowledge, the charter provision has never been used. “The safest thing is to remove that language,” he said.

Baltimore earned about $3.3 billion in revenue in fiscal year 2021, according to the city’s audited annual financial report. Almost 30% of that money — nearly $1 billion — came from property taxes.

During the same period, Baltimore provided approximately $125 million in property tax relief for corporate areas, historic properties, brownfield remediation and more, as well as tax credits for homeowners. .

If the change were implemented tomorrow, it would cost the city hundreds of millions of dollars in lost tax revenue for homeowners, landlords, businesses and investors. But supporters say its phased introduction over six years would soften that blow and eventually generate more revenue as people return to the city and increase the tax base.

“If you unleash the beast and let property values ​​go up, something more like suburbanism, wealth is generated in the process,” Basu said. “I suspect very strongly that long before we implement the tax cut, you will have people flocking to the city – both to live in the city, but also to restore properties in the city.”

The Baltimore Sun asked Renew Baltimore to provide projections for the revenue increases they are considering. He refused. “We don’t take responsibility for designing solutions, designing policies and plans,” said Renew Baltimore spokesman Greg Tucker.

Mac McComas, who studies urban economic growth at Johns Hopkins University, said the proposed tax cut could strain the city’s budget for a few years, especially since the city is legally required to raise taxes. payments to city schools under the mandates of legislation known as the Kirwan Bill. A $65 million allocation was reserved in Baltimore’s finalized 2023 budget. This amount is expected to increase to $77.2 million by fiscal year 2024 and to $155.4 million by 2030.

McComas said he thinks the tax cuts will spur some development and probably won’t hurt the city’s budget in the long run, but he’s not convinced it will automatically reverse population decline or lead to better social services.

“I don’t think there’s a real silver bullet here,” McComas said.

Democratic Mayor Brandon Scott’s administration called the proposal “absurd.” The proposed tax cut would represent a $455 million reduction in the city’s budget over six years, or $75.9 million on an annual basis, spokesman James Bentley said.

“Renew Baltimore dresses its proposal in terms like ‘economic justice’ and ‘fairness,’ but the reality is that its proposal would require a drastic reduction in city services and would acutely affect the most vulnerable residents,” said Bentley.

There’s a valid argument to be made about lowering taxes to attract more development to Baltimore, but don’t call it fairness, said Nicole King, chair of American studies at the University of Maryland, County of Baltimore. To King, it sounds more like wealthy people using the word “equity” to get tax relief. True fairness would mean ending all tax breaks and public funding for private developers, she said.

“It’s about performative inclusion, which makes me very frustrated because it uses the language of inclusion and equity to essentially mask things that are inequitable,” King said.

Renew Baltimore was created as a political committee, which means funders must be made public. The only donor so far is Matthew Wyskiel, a wealth manager who gave $10,100 to the group, according to public records. Wyskiel said he was a lifelong Baltimorean who grew up in Roland Park and now lives on the border of Roland Park and Guilford. According to estimates and public records from Renew Baltimore, Wyskiel would save about $8,000 a year if the tax were fully introduced.

“I think a property tax cut is the best way to help the city of Baltimore and many, many people in the city,” Wyskiel said. “…Renew Baltimore literally helps every neighborhood.”

Much of the argument made by Renew Baltimore is outlined in a 2010 article co-authored by Stephen Walters, professor of economics at Loyola University, and Louis Miserendino, teacher at Calvert Hall High School and co-chair of Renew Baltimore .

The article argues that Baltimore in the 1950s and 1960s was on the same downward trajectory as San Francisco after World War II. Both towns were losing population, as well as manufacturing jobs, while struggling with an increase in crime. Through a statewide initiative in 1978, San Francisco reduced its property tax rates by approximately 60%. Instead of bankrupting San Francisco, the city prospered over the following decades, spurred by new waves of redevelopment and repopulation.

Meanwhile, Baltimore has steadily lost more than 350,000 residents since its population peak in 1950, falling to about 576,000 people last year, and frequently grants major tax breaks and government funding to attract projects to the town.

Walters said in his research he saw residents of Sandtown-Winchester, a low-income, predominantly black neighborhood, pay a property tax rate 20 times higher than the effective tax rate on some major developments in the center. -town. Walters called this “unconscionable.”

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Lawrence Brown said he really liked what Walters and Miserendino wrote about “predatory taxes” and their effects on black Baltimoreans. Brown wrote a book about segregation in Baltimore called “The Black Butterfly”.

Brown also sees San Francisco as an instructive model, but for a different reason. “Although they have cut taxes overall,” he said, “they have not implemented a racially fair tax plan or fair urban planning for black people in San Francisco.”

“As a result, we see black San Franciscans being uprooted and the black population in rapid decline.”

John Kern thinks a massive property tax cut in Baltimore followed by a ‘total windfall’ of development could actually hurt some longtime homeowners in black neighborhoods if safeguards aren’t put in place .

“To me, it’s a cocktail of gentrification,” said Kern, an executive with the SOS Fund, which helps residents who have fallen behind on their property tax bills.

China Boak Terrell, CEO of a nonprofit development company called American Communities Trust, called the reduction in the property tax rate a “fundamental problem in ensuring fairness”, saying it is essential to bring the development and residents in black neighborhoods.

“If Baltimore City had high taxes and it was a very safe city and had the best schools in the country, everyone would be comfortable paying higher taxes. But that’s not our current reality, is it? said Boak Terrell. “…More than any other group in the city, the high property tax affects the black working class individual the most.”

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