State tax – Montgomery Homestead http://montgomeryhomestead.com/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 13:06:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/cropped-icon-32x32.png State tax – Montgomery Homestead http://montgomeryhomestead.com/ 32 32 Another Point of View: State Bridges as Wobbly as the Tax Structure | https://montgomeryhomestead.com/another-point-of-view-state-bridges-as-wobbly-as-the-tax-structure/ Tue, 12 Jul 2022 13:06:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/another-point-of-view-state-bridges-as-wobbly-as-the-tax-structure/ When an appeals court rejected the Wolf administration’s plan to impose tolls on nine major highway bridges, it made the need to rebuild the state’s highway tax structure more urgent. PennDOT wanted to borrow money to repair or replace bridges, including two on Interstate 81 in Susquehanna County and four on Interstate 80 in Luzerne […]]]>

When an appeals court rejected the Wolf administration’s plan to impose tolls on nine major highway bridges, it made the need to rebuild the state’s highway tax structure more urgent.

PennDOT wanted to borrow money to repair or replace bridges, including two on Interstate 81 in Susquehanna County and four on Interstate 80 in Luzerne and Carbon counties, by borrowing money and paying loans with revenue from tolls on these bridges.

The plan had many advantages. First, it would ensure the timely repair or replacement of bridges. Second, the tolls would generate revenue out of state.

But the plan has drawn strong opposition from communities near the targeted bridges whose residents regularly cross them, as well as from the trucking industry and other elements of the shipping industry.

While opposing the toll, the legislator offered no alternative. PennDOT, which is responsible for more than 40,000 miles of roads and 25,000 bridges, says it needs about $15 billion to meet documented highway and bridge maintenance needs, but it’s clear that the current state tax structure to pay for this work is inadequate.

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As Pennsylvania drivers know, they pay a whopping 58 cents per gallon gas tax to fund road and bridge work. But revenues from this tax are stagnating or declining due to the increasing fuel efficiency of modern vehicles. And relying on fossil fuel taxes itself will become a fossil as electric vehicles, including trucks and buses, will inexorably replace conventionally powered vehicles. Electric vehicles accounted for about 8.5% of new vehicle sales in 2021, and they are expected to represent about 20% over the next two years.

So the Commonwealth Court’s rejection of bridge tolls only adds to the need for the state to devise another means of taxation to repair roads and bridges.

Rather than complaining about whatever the administration thinks up, lawmakers should create a taxation system based not on fuel consumption, but on the miles traveled by individual vehicles. The technology is available and is similar to the E-ZPass system which is standard on the Pennsylvania Turnpike.

Scranton Times-Tribune, July 5

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Massachusetts auditor candidates react to state tax refund plan https://montgomeryhomestead.com/massachusetts-auditor-candidates-react-to-state-tax-refund-plan/ Sun, 10 Jul 2022 18:58:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/massachusetts-auditor-candidates-react-to-state-tax-refund-plan/ Everything from food to gasoline costs more these days, and Massachusetts lawmakers hope to ease that burden with a one-time payment to about 2 million taxpayers in the state. Under the state legislature’s proposal, people who earn between $38,000 and $100,000 a year would receive a check for $250. Couples who earn between $38,000 and […]]]>

Everything from food to gasoline costs more these days, and Massachusetts lawmakers hope to ease that burden with a one-time payment to about 2 million taxpayers in the state. Under the state legislature’s proposal, people who earn between $38,000 and $100,000 a year would receive a check for $250. Couples who earn between $38,000 and $150,000 a year would receive a payment of $500. I am grateful that a proposal was recently launched to help working families in our communities,” said State Senator Diana DiZoglio, a Democrat from Methuen. “They are smart to take this approach,” said Chris Dempsey, a Democrat from Brookline who is running against DiZoglio in the primary “I’m glad lawmakers are looking to get money back to the people it belongs to, but my first reaction was, ‘That’s not enough. It doesn’t go far enough,” said Anthony Amore, a Republican from Winchester who is running unopposed in the GOP primary ballot. Each of the three state auditor candidates said the Legislature’s current tax rebate plan leaves out Massachusetts residents who need it most, as people earning less than $38,000 a year there are currently supposed to receive no payment. “This tax refund plan surprises me because it excludes people earning less than $38,000 a year,” Amore said. in spring. The auditor candidates argue that the payment came before inflation spiked. a budget surplus in Massachusetts, and each state auditor candidate said there was enough in that surplus to cover the lowest incomes in the state. “Everyone is hurting right now, especially people who are at the lower end of the income scale, and all these price increases that we’re seeing, the inflation that we’re seeing, is hitting them really hard,” Dempsey said. . . Charlie Baker, a Republican, lobbied for tax cuts instead of tax cuts during his final year in office. But he said Friday that if the tax refund bill passes the state legislature, he would sign it into law. If the legislature’s proposal passes, Massachusetts residents could start receiving those checks in September.

Everything from food to gasoline costs more these days, and Massachusetts lawmakers hope to ease that burden with a one-time payment to about 2 million taxpayers in the state.

Under the state legislature’s proposal, people who earn between $38,000 and $100,000 a year would receive a check for $250. Couples who earn between $38,000 and $150,000 a year would receive a $500 payment.

All three candidates for state auditor whose names will appear on the Sept. 6 state primary ballot back the idea of ​​a tax refund to help ease the pressure of inflation.

“I am grateful that a proposal was recently launched to help working families in our communities,” said State Sen. Diana DiZoglio, Democrat of Methuen.

“They’re smart to take that approach,” said Chris Dempsey, a Democrat from Brookline who is running against DiZoglio in the primary.

“I’m glad lawmakers are looking to get the money back to the people where it belongs, but my first reaction was, ‘It’s not enough. It’s not going far enough,'” said Anthony Amore, a Republican from Winchester who is running unopposed in the GOP primary ballot.

Each of the three candidates for state auditors said the Legislature’s current tax rebate plan omits Massachusetts residents who need it most because people earning less than $38,000 a year shouldn’t. currently receive no payment.

“This tax refund plan surprises me because it excludes people earning less than $38,000 a year,” Amore said.

Massachusetts lawmakers argued that individuals and families earning less than $38,000 already received money for pandemic relief in the spring. The auditor candidates argue that the payment came before inflation spiked.

“We cannot confuse the much needed pandemic relief during this time with the much needed relief these families need right now,” DiZoglio said.

The proposed tax rebate program will be funded by a budget surplus in Massachusetts, and each candidate state auditor has said there is enough in that surplus to cover the lowest incomes in the state.

“Everyone is hurting right now, especially people who are at the lower end of the income scale, and all these price increases that we’re seeing, the inflation that we’re seeing, is hitting them really hard,” Dempsey said. .

Governor Charlie Baker, a Republican, lobbied for tax cuts instead of tax refunds during his final year in office. But he said Friday that if the tax refund bill passes the state legislature, he would sign it into law.

If the legislature’s proposal passes, Massachusetts residents could start receiving those checks in September.

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Midland sales tax revenue soars https://montgomeryhomestead.com/midland-sales-tax-revenue-soars/ Sat, 09 Jul 2022 02:14:20 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/midland-sales-tax-revenue-soars/ ODESSA, Texas (KMID/KPEJ) – The City of Midland is reporting nearly $5.5 million in sales tax revenue for July 2022, an increase of about 46% over the same period last year . But a closer look at the numbers shows that Midland’s current economy is outpacing its pre-pandemic economy. “The numbers for the last three […]]]>

ODESSA, Texas (KMID/KPEJ) – The City of Midland is reporting nearly $5.5 million in sales tax revenue for July 2022, an increase of about 46% over the same period last year . But a closer look at the numbers shows that Midland’s current economy is outpacing its pre-pandemic economy.

“The numbers for the last three months have actually been higher than the same three months of 2019, and 2019 has been a really good year for us,” said Midland’s chief financial officer, Christy Weakland.

Weakland says the city’s low unemployment rate and welcoming environment for new businesses are among the reasons for the city’s strong sales tax revenue. But at the Imperial Mall in Midland, VII Beauty Lounge owner Adam Duong says there’s another element to success, at least when it comes to his business.

“(You have to be) honest with customers. When you can do something, you say “yes”. But some things you can’t do, and you say ‘no’ and you say ‘sorry’,” Duong said.

Midland now finds itself with sales tax revenues in July over $1 million above the monthly budget and in an excellent position to catch up on the city’s priorities.

“We’ve been very fiscally responsible during the COVID pandemic years because we just didn’t know where things were going, and because of that we have a bit of a catch-up to get the interview how far (he must be). Let’s just say, there was deferred maintenance,” Weakland said.

Weakland also says upgrading parks and roads will be a big priority for Midland so the city can continue to attract new businesses and young families.

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TC Supervisors Advance Sales Tax Action https://montgomeryhomestead.com/tc-supervisors-advance-sales-tax-action/ Wed, 06 Jul 2022 20:43:52 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/tc-supervisors-advance-sales-tax-action/ Tuolumne County Supervisors Sonora, Calif. — The Tuolumne County Board of Supervisors took another step by asking voters in November if they should approve a 1% sales tax increase that would go to fire protection, the office of the sheriff and roads. Three people spoke in opposition, raising various concerns, including inflation and the already […]]]>

Sonora, Calif. — The Tuolumne County Board of Supervisors took another step by asking voters in November if they should approve a 1% sales tax increase that would go to fire protection, the office of the sheriff and roads.

Three people spoke in opposition, raising various concerns, including inflation and the already rising cost of living.

The board collectively noted its concern that no group came out in favor of the ballot measure. The council went ahead regardless, noting that it will be up to the public to decide in November. Council members also said they regularly hear concerns about roads, law enforcement and fire protection.

The motion to move forward was made by Supervisor Kathleen Haff and seconded by Supervisor David Goldemberg. It was approved 5-0.

It also requires a second reading, which will be held during the July 19 board meeting.

The ballot measure would require a 2/3 supermajority of voters to pass.

This would increase the Tuolumne County sales tax by one percent, to 8.25 percent. This would bring in $6.4 million a year, with 40% going to fires, 40% to the sheriff’s office, and 20% to roads.

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Iowa Chief Economist Talks Strong State Revenue Numbers | Iowa News https://montgomeryhomestead.com/iowa-chief-economist-talks-strong-state-revenue-numbers-iowa-news/ Mon, 04 Jul 2022 21:10:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/iowa-chief-economist-talks-strong-state-revenue-numbers-iowa-news/ DES MOINES — State of Iowa tax revenue continued on a strong track in May, when net tax revenue rose nearly $402 million — a 42% increase — from May 2021. State taxes on sales, income, fuel and gambling have all increased, according to the state’s nonpartisan Tax Services agency. The Des Moines Journal Bureau […]]]>

DES MOINES — State of Iowa tax revenue continued on a strong track in May, when net tax revenue rose nearly $402 million — a 42% increase — from May 2021.

State taxes on sales, income, fuel and gambling have all increased, according to the state’s nonpartisan Tax Services agency.

The Des Moines Journal Bureau spoke with Robin Anderson, chief state economist at the Iowa Department of Management, about what causes such healthy public finances and how long it can last. Anderson’s answers are edited only for brevity and clarity.

Q: What made sales tax revenue so healthy, including last year?

A: I think it has to do with the health of the economy and consumer spending. The other caveat, I would say, is that we have certainly seen some inflation. And sales tax revenue is nominal. Thus, some of the inflationary pressures could lead to an upward drift in the sales tax data. I want to point out, though, even before the very high inflation rates you’ve seen over the past few months, sales tax revenues have been very high. I think that just shows that the really distinctive consumer spending is in the state, and that matches the national data that we see.

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Q: State income taxes are on the rise, even though fewer Iowans have been working since before the pandemic. How is it going ?

A: I think there are several things going on. Wage growth has been very strong. I think it shows up in the hold data. And wage growth has been… even though jobs aren’t where they were before the pandemic, wage growth is higher than it was before the pandemic. Additionally, we have healthy wage returns, which include other sources of income, including capital gains and farm and business income. And those other sources of income were very strong in tax year ’21.

Q: Will we start to see a decline in state tax revenue as the new tax law comes into effect, which will gradually reduce state tax rates? If yes, when?

A: Certainly, as tax rates come down, we are going to see less income tax. How are the company’s revenues changing? This will also matter for receipts in the future.

Q: What do the coming months look like for total state tax revenue? Will the good news continue?

A: I think state revenues are currently very healthy. Admittedly, the budgetary situation, at least for this year, is very solid. Moving away from that, which is good news, I think there’s a lot of uncertainty about where the US economy is going right now. And there’s a lot of debate about recession risk right now. And that’s something we’re monitoring.

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Republican state senator calls for special session to suspend sales tax https://montgomeryhomestead.com/republican-state-senator-calls-for-special-session-to-suspend-sales-tax/ Sun, 03 Jul 2022 01:50:05 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/republican-state-senator-calls-for-special-session-to-suspend-sales-tax/ By The Staff of The Chronicle In a statement released this week, State Sen. Mark Schoesler, R-Ritzville, called on Governor Jay Inslee to call a special session of the Legislature to pass a sales tax suspension. “If Governor Inslee and Democratic congressional leaders like Speaker Pelosi and Senator Schumer think a gas tax holiday is […]]]>

By The Staff of The Chronicle

In a statement released this week, State Sen. Mark Schoesler, R-Ritzville, called on Governor Jay Inslee to call a special session of the Legislature to pass a sales tax suspension.

“If Governor Inslee and Democratic congressional leaders like Speaker Pelosi and Senator Schumer think a gas tax holiday is a bad idea, let’s focus on suspending the state sales tax. for Washingtonians,” Schoesler said. “It’s a quick and easy solution to help consumers in our state who are struggling with record inflation, and it would solve what many people call a regressive tax. If the Governor likes gas prices as high as they are, deliver tax relief in a different way. And let’s do it soon.

According to Schoesler, who sits on the Senate Ways and Means Committee, a sales tax suspension would be particularly beneficial for places along Washington’s border with other states, including Spokane, Pullman and Vancouver, whose residents cross. the border where they don’t have to pay sales tax.

Schoesler would like to see the sales tax reduced by one percentage point, preferably permanently, but at least until inflation subsides.

He pointed to projections by the State Revenue and Economic Forecasting Council, whose director, Dr. Steve Lerch, said inflation had led to an increase in projected revenues.

“It is wrong and immoral for the state to make more or less profit on the backs of taxpayers due to record inflation. Our governor needs to realize this and finally support tax relief for Washingtonians instead of treating them like an ATM for his spending agenda,” Schoesler said.

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States with the highest gas prices | Best States https://montgomeryhomestead.com/states-with-the-highest-gas-prices-best-states/ Thu, 30 Jun 2022 21:26:53 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/states-with-the-highest-gas-prices-best-states/ They’re on the minds of anyone who has to drive, especially as the summer travel season begins: gas prices. The lingering effects of the pandemic and Russia’s war with Ukraine have boosted global oil supplies, pushing prices at the pump to levels not seen in 2014. After a spike that began earlier this month, prices […]]]>

They’re on the minds of anyone who has to drive, especially as the summer travel season begins: gas prices. The lingering effects of the pandemic and Russia’s war with Ukraine have boosted global oil supplies, pushing prices at the pump to levels not seen in 2014.

After a spike that began earlier this month, prices are starting to fall this week ahead of the July 4 bank holiday weekend. Either way, drivers in some states definitely have it worse than others. As of June 30, average regular gasoline prices ranged from $4.36 in Georgia to a huge high of $6.29 in Californiaaccording to AAA National Automobile Club. The national average was $4.86, an increase of almost 56% over last year.

The Western and Pacific states face the most expensive gas in the country, as the five highest priced states are California, Hawaii ($5.60), Alaska ($5.57), Nevada ($5.57) and Oregon ($5.49). Of course, there can be significant cost differences within a state or even a city, depending on factors such as local competition or an area’s access to pipelines and refineries.

California’s high average gas price is particularly notable because it’s home to the most cars of any state and some of the longest commute times in the country. Why is gas so expensive in the Golden State? It’s a combination of higher environmental standards for fuel and higher gasoline taxes than most states. Gas stations must sell a cleaner fuel blend that few refineries outside of California produce, which can make it difficult to find fuel in times of shortage.

“Gasoline prices in California are generally higher and more variable than prices in other states because relatively few supply sources offer California’s unique blend of gasoline outside of the state,” noted the US Energy Information Administration.

For cheaper prices, head south, where you’ll find the five states with the cheapest average gas prices: Georgia ($4.36), Caroline from the south ($4.37), Mississippi ($4.38), Arkansas ($4.41) and Louisiana ($4.42).

Although the South stands out with cheaper prices, the states that have seen the lowest relative price changes over the past year are actually further west. Hawaii saw the smallest percentage price change from a year ago, an increase of “only” about 40%. Price in California, Colorado and Washington the whole increased by about 45%.

On the other hand, the inhabitants of Arizona were particularly unlucky because their state saw the largest percentage increase in gasoline prices year over year: a 67% increase from $3.13 to $5.22. Massachusetts, New Hampshire and Vermont all also saw increases of more than 63%.

While gas prices right now may make drivers cringe, these aren’t the worst increases in recent US history. According to the US Energy Information Administration, inflation-adjusted gas prices were equally high or higher from 2011 to 2014, from 2005 to 2008, and from 1980 to 1981.

National leaders are considering ways to give motorists a break from the pumps. President Joe Biden last week called for Congress to approve a three-month gas tax exemption, which could save drivers up to 18 cents per gallon. The movement, however, faces an uncertain future.

With falling prices for the second consecutive week, there is reason for optimism for consumers, as the Energy Information Administration predicts the decline could continue. But if the pandemic has taught the country anything, it’s that the world can often go in directions no one would expect.

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Modesto CA officials plan to tax November ballot https://montgomeryhomestead.com/modesto-ca-officials-plan-to-tax-november-ballot/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/modesto-ca-officials-plan-to-tax-november-ballot/ Modesto police arrest a man after a rollover accident on K Street in Modesto, Calif. on Tuesday, April 12, 2022. Andy Alfaro aalfaro@modbee.com Modesto City Council is expected to impose a 1% sales tax on the November ballot on Tuesday. If approved by voters, city officials say the tax would raise $39 million a year […]]]>

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Modesto police arrest a man after a rollover accident on K Street in Modesto, Calif. on Tuesday, April 12, 2022.

aalfaro@modbee.com

Modesto City Council is expected to impose a 1% sales tax on the November ballot on Tuesday. If approved by voters, city officials say the tax would raise $39 million a year for public safety, homelessness and scourge, park improvements and other things basic.

The city is proposing a general sales tax for the ballot. It requires a simple majority to pass and can be used for any general government purpose.

Modesto’s current tax rate is 7.875%. For comparison, Ceres’ rate is 8.375%, Turlock’s is 8.625%, Manteca’s is 8.25% and Stockton’s is 9%, according to the California Department of Tax and Fee Administration.

The tax would have fiscal effect in April 2023 if approved by voters.

The sales tax ordinance states that the city council would appoint a nine-member Board of Supervisors by June 2023 that would meet publicly at least semi-annually “to review all receipts and expenditures of the tax funds authorized by this ordinance. , review annual audit reports related to this tax measure and make at least one annual written report to the municipal council at a public meeting summarizing the findings of the board of oversight.

The council would be made up of members from each of the council’s six districts and three members at large. The ordinance states that the council “will give strong preference to members who represent a cross-section of the community.”

The order states that this includes representatives from schools, local business associations, chambers of commerce, non-profit organizations, non-partisan political groups, ratepayers associations, seniors groups and neighborhood associations. .

The ballot measure for the tax says it “would fund general city services…, such as police patrol, gang, drug and crime prevention; fire protection, paramedic/911 emergency response; fighting homelessness; clean up trash and illegal dumps; keep streets, parks, sidewalks, landscapes and infrastructure safe, clean and well maintained….”

The measure also says it would take another vote to end the tax.

The 1% sales tax goes to the city’s general fund, which accounts for about one-third of the city’s operating budget. (The operating budget for the city’s next budget, which begins Friday, is $508 million.)

The general fund of the new budget is planned at 171 million dollars. (This is somewhat misleading as it includes $4.5 million in one-time federal funding for pandemic relief.) About 80% of the fund is spent on police and fire departments, the rest on other basic services, including parks.

City officials said that due to state funding formulas, Modesto does not receive as much general fund revenue as its peer cities. Officials also say that while its general fund revenues, which are mostly sales, property and other taxes, are growing, they are not growing as fast as general fund expenditures. These expenses relate mainly to employee compensation, including pensions.

This has led to structural deficits since the Great Recession more than a dozen years ago, which the city has closed each year through measures such as freezing or eliminating open positions and reducing services.

City manager Joe Lopez warns in a report to city council that without this sales tax measure, the city will face the reduction or elimination of essential services in the coming years, most of it coming from security. public.

The board meets at 5:30 p.m. in the basement rooms at Tenth Street Place, 1010 10th St. The meeting will also be livestreamed, and the public can watch and ask questions on Zoom.

More information is available at www.modestogov.com/749/City-Council-Agendas-Minutes and by clicking on the meeting link.

Modesto Bee Related Stories

Kevin Valine covers local government, homelessness and general missions for The Modesto Bee. He graduated from San José State University.

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Three upcoming sales tax holidays in Tennessee https://montgomeryhomestead.com/three-upcoming-sales-tax-holidays-in-tennessee/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 20:06:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/three-upcoming-sales-tax-holidays-in-tennessee/ Knoxville, Tenn. (WVLT) – Caution! There are three sales tax holidays in Tennessee this year, and all are coming soon. In addition to the traditional sales tax exemption on clothing, school supplies and computers, the Tennessee General Assembly approved two additional tax-free days, one for groceries and another for gun safes and security equipment. The […]]]>

Knoxville, Tenn. (WVLT) – Caution! There are three sales tax holidays in Tennessee this year, and all are coming soon.

In addition to the traditional sales tax exemption on clothing, school supplies and computers, the Tennessee General Assembly approved two additional tax-free days, one for groceries and another for gun safes and security equipment.

The first tax holiday of 2022 covers gun safes and security equipment. It will start at 12:01 a.m. on July 1 and end at 11:59 p.m. on June 30, 2023. The gun safes included in the promotion include locking containers equipped with a padlock, key lock, combination lock or any other device intended to store weapons securely. A state spokesperson said safeties are defined as an “integrated device to be fitted or installed on a firearm that allows the user to program the firearm so that it will not works only for specified persons designated by the user via computerized locking devices or other means integrated and permanent part of the firearm.

Tennesseans can look forward to the traditional sales tax day this year covering clothing, school supplies and computers. It will start at 12:01 a.m. on Friday, July 29 and end at 11:59 p.m. on Sunday, July 31. Items sold online will be eligible; however, certain restrictions apply. Find out here which items are tax exempt during the holidays.

For the last tax-free holiday to begin this year, the long-awaited grocery sales tax suspension will begin at 12:01 a.m. on Monday, August 1 and end at 11:50 p.m. on Wednesday, August 31.

Learn more about sales tax holidays here.

Upcoming tax holidays in Tennessee(TTD)

Copyright 2022 WVLT. All rights reserved.

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Colorado man sentenced for helping South Dakota men evade income tax https://montgomeryhomestead.com/colorado-man-sentenced-for-helping-south-dakota-men-evade-income-tax/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 20:02:00 +0000 https://montgomeryhomestead.com/colorado-man-sentenced-for-helping-south-dakota-men-evade-income-tax/ SIOUX FALLS, SD (Dakota News Now) — Men who work with the IRS and helped a South Dakota man and his son evade income tax have been sentenced to probation and fined. Loren Brown and Randy Garriss worked corruptly within the IRS to allow two South Dakota men to evade income tax, according to a […]]]>

SIOUX FALLS, SD (Dakota News Now) — Men who work with the IRS and helped a South Dakota man and his son evade income tax have been sentenced to probation and fined.

Loren Brown and Randy Garriss worked corruptly within the IRS to allow two South Dakota men to evade income tax, according to a statement from the United States Department of Justice.

Brown helped South Dakota men Theodore Nelson and his son Steven Nelson open 25 bogus trusts. Brown gave them the forms they needed to create the bogus trusts. These trusts were designed to make it difficult for the IRS to determine how much the men owed in federal income tax. Garriss acted as a signatory to the South Dakota bank accounts associated with the Nelson Trusts and performed most of their actions on behalf of the Nelsons’ tax evasion.

The Nelsons named John Sheridan and Loren Brown as trustees and successor trustees of the trusts until Sheridan’s death in 2011. In 2011, Garriss joined the plot as trustee of the Nelsons’ trusts.

“One of the IRS Criminal Investigation’s highest priorities is to combat abusive tax avoidance schemes and the individuals who promote them,” said Special Agent in Charge Tyler Hatcher, IRS Criminal Investigation. “Randy Garriss’ guilty verdict for his agreement to conspire against and obstruct the IRS with Ted Nelson, Steve Nelson and Loren Brown shows how IRS Criminal Investigation will work with the U.S. Attorney’s Office to bring tax evaders to justice. ”

Loren Brown, 86, was sentenced to three years probation, a fine of $3,000 and a special contribution to the Federal Fund for Victims of Crime in the amount of $100. Brown was indicted by a federal grand jury on July 17, 2017. He pleaded guilty on August 10, 2020.

Randy Garriss received charges that carry a maximum sentence of five years in federal prison and/or a $250,000 fine, three years of supervised release and a special contribution of up to $200 to the Federal Death Fund. assistance to victims of crime.

This case was investigated by the IRS Criminal Investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorney Ann M. Hoffman prosecuted the case. A pre-sentence hearing has been ordered and a sentencing date has been set for September 12, 2022.

Garriss was released on bail pending sentencing.

Copyright 2022 Dakota News Now. All rights reserved.

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